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UK Salary Income Tax Calculator

Calculate your salary after tax with our easy-to-use UK salary income tax calculator.
Use our take-home calculator to work out how much you earn after tax, national insurance, student loan and pension contributions for the current (2021/22) and previous tax years. Available in daily, weekly, monthly and yearly values.
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About this calculator
  • This calculator aims to simplify the process of working out your salary after tax. Enter your gross salary and any applicable options, and we'll crunch the figures into an easy-to-understand table.
  • As the calculator does not take into account any additional circumstances or arrangements between the employee and employer, it does not constitute financial advice. You should always do your own research to ensure it's right for your specific circumstances. Our tool is an excellent way to find out your salary after tax after getting a new job or promotion.
  • This calculator does not yet take into account student loan repayments. Please see below for some working examples with student loan repayments factored in.

Working examples:

£20,000 after tax
Ivan has a gross salary of £20,000. Ivan does not make pension contributions and is below the student loan repayment threshold.

Based on the 2021/22 tax year, Ivan has a personal allowance of £12,579.

Ivan will pay the basic rate of tax - 20% - on his taxable income (gross salary - personal allowance) of £7,421. This works out as £1,484.20 in income tax deductions.

After deducting Ivan’s national insurance contributions of £1,251.84, Ivan is left with a take-home salary of £17,262.16 after tax.
£24,000 after tax
Katie has a gross salary of £24,000. Katie does not make pension contributions and is below the student loan repayment threshold.

Based on the 2021/22 tax year, Katie has a personal allowance of £12,579.

Katie will pay the basic rate of tax - 20% - on her taxable income (gross salary - personal allowance) of £11,421. This works out as £2,284.20 in income tax deductions.

After deducting Katie’s national insurance contributions of £1,731.84, Katie is left with a take-home salary of £19,982.16 after tax.
£28,000 after tax
David has a gross salary of £28,000. David does not make pension contributions, but has student loan repayments to make.

Based on the 2021/22 tax year, Katie has a personal allowance of £12,579.

David will pay the basic rate of tax - 20% - on his taxable income (gross salary - personal allowance) of £15,421. This works out as £3,084.20 in income tax deductions.

After deducting David’s student loan (Plan 2) of £63.45 and national insurance contributions of £2,211.84, David is left with a take-home salary of £22,638.71 after tax.
£32,000 after tax
Lucie has a gross salary of £32,000. Lucie does not make pension contributions, but has student loan repayments to make.

Based on the 2021/22 tax year, Lucie has a personal allowance of £12,579.

Lucie will pay the basic rate of tax - 20% - on her taxable income (gross salary - personal allowance) of £19,421. This works out as £3,884.20 in income tax deductions.

After deducting Lucie’s student loan (Plan 2) of £423.45 and national insurance contributions of £2,691.84, Lucie is left with a take-home salary of £24,998.71 after tax.
£36,000 after tax
Josh has a gross salary of £36,000. Josh does not make pension contributions, but has student loan repayments to make.

Based on the 2021/22 tax year, Josh has a personal allowance of £12,579.

Josh will pay the basic rate of tax - 20% - on his taxable income (gross salary - personal allowance) of £23,421. This works out as £4,684.20 in income tax deductions.

After deducting Josh’s student loan (Plan 2) of £783.45 and national insurance contributions of £3,171.84, Josh is left with a take-home salary of £27,358.71 after tax.
£40,000 after tax
Liam has a gross salary of £40,000. Liam does not make pension contributions, but has student loan repayments to make.

Based on the 2021/22 tax year, Liam has a personal allowance of £12,579.

Liam will pay the basic rate of tax - 20% - on his taxable income (gross salary - personal allowance) of £27,421. This works out as £5,484.20 in income tax deductions.

After deducting Liam’s student loan (Plan 2) of £1,143.45 and national insurance contributions of £3,651.84, Liam is left with a take-home salary of £29,718.71 after tax.
£44,000 after tax
Jack has a gross salary of £44,000. Jack does not make pension contributions, but has student loan repayments to make.

Based on the 2021/22 tax year, Jack has a personal allowance of £12,579.

Jack will pay the basic rate of tax - 20% - on his taxable income (gross salary - personal allowance) of £31,421. This works out as £6,284.20 in income tax deductions.

After deducting Jack’s student loan (Plan 2) of £1,503.45 and national insurance contributions of £4,131.84, Jack is left with a take-home salary of £32,078.71 after tax.
£48,000 after tax
Charlotte has a gross salary of £48,000. Charlotte does not make pension contributions, but has student loan repayments to make.

Based on the 2021/22 tax year, Charlotte has a personal allowance of £12,579.

Charlotte will pay the basic rate of tax - 20% - on her taxable income (gross salary - personal allowance) of £35,421. This works out as £7,084.20 in income tax deductions.

After deducting Charlotte’s student loan (Plan 2) of £1,863.45 and national insurance contributions of £4,611.84, Charlotte is left with a take-home salary of £34,438.71 after tax.
£52,000 after tax
Shannon has a gross salary of £52,000. Shannon does not make pension contributions, but has student loan repayments to make.

Based on the 2021/22 tax year, Shannon has a personal allowance of £12,579.

Shannon’s total taxable income (gross salary - personal allowance) is £39,421. She will will pay the basic rate of tax - 20% - on the first £37,700, and the higher rate of tax - 40% - on the remaining £1,721. This works out as £8,232 in income tax deductions.

After deducting Shannon’s student loan (Plan 2) of £2,223.45 and national insurance contributions of £4,918.84, Shannon is left with a take-home salary of £36,625.71 after tax.
£56,000 after tax
Chris has a gross salary of £56,000. Chris does not make pension contributions, but has student loan repayments to make.

Based on the 2021/22 tax year, Chris has a personal allowance of £12,579.

Chris’ total taxable income (gross salary - personal allowance) is £43,421. He will will pay the basic rate of tax - 20% - on the first £37,700, and the higher rate of tax - 40% - on the remaining £5,721. This works out as £9,832 in income tax deductions.

After deducting Chris’ student loan (Plan 2) of £2,583.45 and national insurance contributions of £4,998.84, Chris is left with a take-home salary of £38,585.71 after tax.
£60,000 after tax
Mitchell has a gross salary of £60,000. Mitchell does not make pension contributions, but has student loan repayments to make.

Based on the 2021/22 tax year, Mitchell has a personal allowance of £12,579.

Mitchell’s total taxable income (gross salary - personal allowance) is £47,421. He will will pay the basic rate of tax - 20% - on the first £37,700, and the higher rate of tax - 40% - on the remaining £9,721. This works out as £11,432 in income tax deductions.

After deducting Mitchell’s student loan (Plan 2) of £2,943.45 and national insurance contributions of £5,078.84, Mitchell is left with a take-home salary of £40,545.71 after tax.
£64,000 after tax
Amber has a gross salary of £64,000. Amber does not make pension contributions, but has student loan repayments to make.

Based on the 2021/22 tax year, Amber has a personal allowance of £12,579.

Amber’s total taxable income (gross salary - personal allowance) is £51,421. She will will pay the basic rate of tax - 20% - on the first £37,700, and the higher rate of tax - 40% - on the remaining £13,721. This works out as £13,032 in income tax deductions.

After deducting Amber’s student loan (Plan 2) of £3,303.45 and national insurance contributions of £5,158.84, Amber is left with a take-home salary of £42,505.71 after tax.
£68,000 after tax
Joanna has a gross salary of £68,000. Joanna does not make pension contributions, but has student loan repayments to make.

Based on the 2021/22 tax year, Joanna has a personal allowance of £12,579.

Joanna’s total taxable income (gross salary - personal allowance) is £55,421. She will will pay the basic rate of tax - 20% - on the first £37,700, and the higher rate of tax - 40% - on the remaining £17,721. This works out as £14,632 in income tax deductions.

After deducting Joanna’s student loan (Plan 2) of £3,663.45 and national insurance contributions of £5,238.84, Joanna is left with a take-home salary of £44,465.71 after tax.
£72,000 after tax
Michael has a gross salary of £72,000. Michael does not make pension contributions, but has student loan repayments to make.

Based on the 2021/22 tax year, Michael has a personal allowance of £12,579.

Michael’s total taxable income (gross salary - personal allowance) is £59,421. He will will pay the basic rate of tax - 20% - on the first £37,700, and the higher rate of tax - 40% - on the remaining £21,721. This works out as £16,232 in income tax deductions.

After deducting Michael’s student loan (Plan 2) of £4,023.45 and national insurance contributions of £5,318.84, Michael is left with a take-home salary of £46,425.71 after tax.
£76,000 after tax
Seb has a gross salary of £28,000. Seb does not make pension contributions, but has student loan repayments to make.

Based on the 2021/22 tax year, Seb has a personal allowance of £12,579.

Seb’s total taxable income (gross salary - personal allowance) is £63,421. He will will pay the basic rate of tax - 20% - on the first £37,700, and the higher rate of tax - 40% - on the remaining £25,721. This works out as £17,832 in income tax deductions.

After deducting Seb’s student loan (Plan 2) of £4,383.45 and national insurance contributions of £5,398.84, Seb is left with a take-home salary of £48,385.71 after tax.
£80,000 after tax
Sarah has a gross salary of £80,000. Sarah does not make pension contributions, but has student loan repayments to make.

Based on the 2021/22 tax year, Sarah has a personal allowance of £12,579.

Sarah’s total taxable income (gross salary - personal allowance) is £67,421. She will will pay the basic rate of tax - 20% - on the first £37,700, and the higher rate of tax - 40% - on the remaining £29,721. This works out as £19,432 in income tax deductions.

After deducting Sarah’s student loan (Plan 2) of £4,743.45 and national insurance contributions of £5,478.84, Sarah is left with a take-home salary of £50,345.71 after tax.
£84,000 after tax
James has a gross salary of £84,000. James does not make pension contributions, but has student loan repayments to make.

Based on the 2021/22 tax year, James has a personal allowance of £12,579.

James’ total taxable income (gross salary - personal allowance) is £71,421. He will will pay the basic rate of tax - 20% - on the first £37,700, and the higher rate of tax - 40% - on the remaining £33,721. This works out as £21,032 in income tax deductions.

After deducting James’ student loan (Plan 2) of £5,103.45 and national insurance contributions of £5,558.84, James is left with a take-home salary of £52,305.71 after tax.
£88,000 after tax
Andrew has a gross salary of £88,000. Andrew does not make pension contributions, but has student loan repayments to make.

Based on the 2021/22 tax year, Andrew has a personal allowance of £12,579.

Andrew’s total taxable income (gross salary - personal allowance) is £75,421. He will will pay the basic rate of tax - 20% - on the first £37,700, and the higher rate of tax - 40% - on the remaining £37,721. This works out as £22,632 in income tax deductions.

After deducting Andrew’s student loan (Plan 2) of £5,463.45 and national insurance contributions of £5,638.84, Andrew is left with a take-home salary of £54,265.71 after tax.
£92,000 after tax
Mohammed has a gross salary of £92,000. Mohammed does not make pension contributions, but has student loan repayments to make.

Based on the 2021/22 tax year, Mohammed has a personal allowance of £12,579.

Mohammed’s total taxable income (gross salary - personal allowance) is £79,421. He will will pay the basic rate of tax - 20% - on the first £37,700, and the higher rate of tax - 40% - on the remaining £41,721. This works out as £24,232 in income tax deductions.

After deducting Mohammed’s student loan (Plan 2) of £5,823.45 and national insurance contributions of £5,718.84, Mohammed is left with a take-home salary of £56,225.71 after tax.
£96,000 after tax
Melissa has a gross salary of £96,000. Melissa does not make pension contributions, but has student loan repayments to make.

Based on the 2021/22 tax year, Melissa has a personal allowance of £12,579.

Melissa’s total taxable income (gross salary - personal allowance) is £83,421. She will will pay the basic rate of tax - 20% - on the first £37,700, and the higher rate of tax - 40% - on the remaining £45,721. This works out as £25,832 in income tax deductions.

After deducting Melissa’s student loan (Plan 2) of £6,183.45 and national insurance contributions of £5,798.84, Melissa is left with a take-home salary of £58,185.71 after tax.
£100,000 after tax
Jonathan has a gross salary of £100,000. Jonathan does not make pension contributions, but has student loan repayments to make.

Based on the 2021/22 tax year, Jonathan has a personal allowance of £12,579.

Jonathan’s total taxable income (gross salary - personal allowance) is £87,421. He will will pay the basic rate of tax - 20% - on the first £37,700, and the higher rate of tax - 40% - on the remaining £49,721. This works out as £27,432 in income tax deductions.

After deducting Jonathan’s student loan (Plan 2) of £6,543.45 and national insurance contributions of £5,878.84, Jonathan is left with a take-home salary of £60,145.71 after tax.
£150,000 after tax
Ryan has a gross salary of £150,000. Ryan does not make pension contributions, but has student loan repayments to make.

Ryan does not have a personal allowance, as it goes down by £1 for every £2 that his adjusted net income is above £100,000. This means that Ryan’s personal allowance went down to £0 once his gross pay exceeded £125,140.

Ryan’s total taxable income is £150,000. He will will pay the basic rate of tax - 20% - on the first £37,700, and the higher rate of tax - 40% - on the remaining £112,300. This works out as £52,460 in income tax deductions.

After deducting Ryan’s student loan (Plan 2) of £11,043.45 and national insurance contributions of £6,878.84, Ryan is left with a take-home salary of £79,617.71 after tax.
£200,000 after tax
Jamie has a gross salary of £200,000. Jamie does not make pension contributions, but has student loan repayments to make.

Jamie does not have a personal allowance, as it goes down by £1 for every £2 that her adjusted net income is above £100,000. This means that Jamie’s personal allowance went down to £0 once her gross pay exceeded £125,140.

Jamie’s total taxable income is £200,000. She will will pay the basic rate of tax - 20% - on the first £37,700, and the higher rate of tax - 40% - on £112,300. She will also pay the additional tax rate of 45% on her earnings over £150,000 - £50,000. This works out as £74,960 in income tax deductions.

After deducting Jamie’s student loan (Plan 2) of £15,543.45 and national insurance contributions of £7,878.84, Jamie is left with a take-home salary of £101,617.71 after tax.
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